Brides and Rogues…

Fallen, book #1 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixAnd one rogue angel!

From now through the end of May, my Bride Quest II trilogy and my Rogues of Ravensmuir trilogy are on sale. The Countess and The Beauty Bride are both discounted to 99 cents, while The Beauty, The Temptress, The Rogue, The Scoundrel and The Warrior are each priced at $2.99. Here’s your chance to read these two bestselling Scottish medieval romance trilogies. Also, Fallen is $2.99 so you can begin my urban fantasy series featuring fallen angel heroes. Usually, all of these titles are priced at $4.99 each.

The Bride Quest II Boxed Set, a trilogy of medieval Scottish romances by Claire DelacroixThe Bride Quest II and Rogues of Ravensmuir boxed sets are also on sale for half their usual price – $4.99 instead of $9.99.

This pricing is available at Amazon, Apple, B&N and Kobo, through May 31. Don’t miss out!

Last Chance

Today’s the last day of March, which means it’s the last day for my March Madness sale. Don’t miss out on your chance to pick up digital editions of these titles for just $2.99 US or equivalent, at Amazon, B&N, All Romance eBooks, Apple iBook and KOBO :

Fallen, book #1 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixGuardian, book #2 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixRebel, book #3 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixThe Renegade's Heart, book #1 of the True Love Brides Series of Scottish medieval romances, by Claire DelacroixThe Highlander's Curse, book #2 of the True Love Brides series of medieval Scottish romances by Claire Delacroix

Review for Abyss

Here’s a review for Abyss from Debbie Haupt at the Reading Frenzy. Deb is one of those readers who really wanted Tupperman’s story told, so I’m VERY relieved that she liked the book. Here’s what she said:

Abyss, book #4 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire Delacroix
“Claire Delacroix’s finale to her urban fantasy romance series is fantastic, she’ll take readers down terrifying dark alleys, wide open spaces and fill the air with angelic voices with her always fluent, sometimes frightening and visual narrative. Her selfless hero and determined heroine are perfect for each other and are perfectly portrayed as they dodge bad guys and fall in love. She’ll catch readers up on her co-stars past happenings as she weaves the intricate web of her current Angel tale.”

You can read the rest of the review on her blog, right here.

Bitten by Books Review of Rebel

Rebel, book #3 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixAnd today, we have the third review from Carol Malcolm at Bitten by Books for my Prometheus Project series of urban fantasy romances. This one is for Rebel, and here is the concluding paragraph of her review:

“In this fabulous novel, Delacroix masterfully combines the unlikely mix of non-stop action and suspense with intriguing intellectual ideas, providing a glimpse into a horrifying world that feels all too possible. The depiction of a society ravaged by nuclear destruction, the shades suffering the literal fall-out, that descends into abject slavery and rampant bigotry makes the reader’s skin crawl. Despite this representation and the images used to portray it, the tone of the narrative contains a strong positive element due to the thread of hope that runs throughout.

The presence of the visiting angels seeking to aid humanity and essentially save them from themselves bolsters that atmosphere of optimism, but Armand, before meeting Theodora, questions the wisdom of angelic involvement. Longing to rejoin with the rest of the host and unsure of the success of his mission, Armand wonders, “What would he do in this sphere, with no hope of ever escaping it?” (250). Though not the primary focus of the story, the growing relationship between angel and wraith adds poignancy and determination to the mission of both characters.

Though this reviewer regrets not being able to return to this fascinating universe due to this installment marking the end of the series, Rebel delivers a highly-satisfying conclusion to the superb Prometheus Project Trilogy.”

Of course, I’m sending Carol a copy of Tupperman’s book, Abyss, to review. You can read all of her review for Rebel on the Bitten by Books site right here, and you can read an excerpt from Rebel on this site, right here.

Bitten by Books Review of Guardian

Guardian, book #2 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixToday, I’m continuing to share Carol Malcolm’s wonderful reviews of my Prometheus Project series of urban fantasy romances. Here are her concluding comments in her review of Guardian:

“No mean feat, the author ably sustains the suspense of the characters on the run in a cat-and-mouse game for the duration of the novel, resulting in a page-turning reading experience with thrills and surprises. Delacroix creates a stark, horrifying, and heartbreaking world visited by brief moments of beauty when the angels come to call. The introduction of the wraiths, the shadowy former citizens who will do any job for a price, adds an eerie quality to the narrative. The mixture of futuristic science fiction and angel lore works due to the strong characterizations of both Delilah and Rafe as the threads binding the two aspects together. Though a bit more of a paranormal romance than its predecessor, this book should also please urban fantasy fans. This reviewer looks forward to the next installment in the series.”

You can read the entire review on the Bitten by Books site right here, and you can read an excerpt from Guardian on this site right here.

Bitten by Books Review of Fallen

Fallen, book #1 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixOne of the fun things about attending conferences is meeting reviewers, readers and other writers. I met Carol Malcolm from Bitten by Books at the Coastal Magic Conference and we ended up talking about my Prometheus Project. She said she’d reviewed the books when they were originally published, but I had never seen the reviews. Well, she very kindly sent me the links, so I’m going to share these wonderful reviews with you.

Here’s the concluding paragraph of her review of Fallen:
“Delacroix’s fully-realized, disturbing world pulls the reader in on the first page and the narrative maintains both its suspenseful pace and intriguing storyline for the duration of the novel. The appealing Lilia and Adam and their respective backstories set against the backdrop of a post-apocalyptic landscape combine to provide a multi-layered reading experience. This absorbing and compelling urban fantasy/science fiction hybrid will satisfy fans of both genres and has this reviewer looking ahead to book two.”

You can read her complete review right here, and you can read an excerpt from Fallen, right here.

 

February Reader Contest

It’s time for another reader contest. This month’s prize is a signed trade paperback copy of Abyss, the new and fourth book in my urban fantasy romance series, The Prometheus Project.

Abyss, book #4 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire Delacroix

All you have to do for a chance to win is comment on this post. I’ll pick a winner at the end of the month. As always, my contests are open to international entries, and for every 25 entries, I’ll add another prize book.

Good luck!

Reader Letter from Abyss

Abyss, book #4 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire Delacroix

Dear Reader;

Ideas are strange and wonderful things. Not only are they nearly impossible to anticipate, but the most unlikely ones can be the most beguiling. I had written quite a number of medieval romances when the idea behind the Prometheus Project came to me. I was skeptical of the notion of writing an urban fantasy romance with a mystery subplot, never mind one set in a gritty dystopian future, but Lilia Desjardins wouldn’t take no for an answer. She was persistent and wanted her story told. Publishers also thought the idea was a risky one, given my solid publishing history in medieval romance. The editor who ultimately acquired Fallen did so after I agreed to her suggestion to make the book into a trilogy. There was a lot of the Republic to explore, and I knew I could write three books set there. I also knew she was right that there should be more than one book in my publishing history in this different market niche.

I had a wonderful time writing Fallen, Guardian and Rebel: it was invigorating to visit new territory, so to speak, and work with different story elements than I had previously. I was fortunate to have the support of my publishing house and of my agent in trying something different. When the initial trilogy was completed, though, it troubled me that Tupperman had never had his happily-ever-after. Initially, he was a minor character, but his role grew over the series to the point that I felt I was abandoning him. The problem was that I didn’t know his story.

Several years later, ideas worked their magic again and I realized what Tupperman’s story would be. I had thought that it would be a novella, but as I started to write, Tupperman’s story kept getting longer. I really liked the story, so was easily convinced to spend more time in the new Republic. In the meantime, an interesting thing happened: the publishing rights for the initial trilogy returned to me. This gave me the welcome opportunity to have those three books edited again and published in new editions. I held off on publication of Tupperman’s story until that was completed.

This meant that I needed new covers for the original trilogy, too. I loved the covers on the Tor mass market editions—each featuring the hero alone—but didn’t have the right to use them. After much discussion, Kim Killion and I decided to use the heroines on the covers for these editions, to give the books more of an urban fantasy look. I’m very happy with the result.

And so, welcome to Tupperman’s story. It is set several years after the events in Rebel, when some things have changed in the Republic but others have not. The angels that Tupperman convinced to shed their wings and fight for the future of humanity have become an elite corps of soldiers called the Watchful Host. The problem is that someone is murdering the members of the Watchful Host, and worse, making it look as if Tupperman is the source of the betrayal. A disenchanted Tupperman believes that the time for his final mission has arrived, so he leaves New Gotham to meet his fate, suspecting he will never return. En route, he meets Kara, a woman who entices him and challenges him—and gives him more than enough reason to survive. It’s not a spoiler to tell you that Tupperman will finally get his happily-ever-after in this final book of the Republic.

Until next time, I hope you are well and have plenty of good books to read.

All my best,
Claire

Read an excerpt from Abyss.

REBEL Reader Letter

Rebel, book #3 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixDear Reader;

The Prometheus Project trilogy of urban fantasy romances was a departure for me in many ways, a visit to a very gritty dystopian world of the future, where angels voluntarily shed their wings in a quest to aid humanity. This world is filled with secrets and concealed truths, so it shouldn’t be a surprise that each book gave me new questions to answer. We started outside an “old city” in Fallen, an off-limit zone that Lilia Desjardins was bold enough to explore. We learned not only about the angels shedding their wings in that book, but about the survivors hidden in the old cities like Gotham. In Guardian, we went on a quest with Rafe to find and protect a woman who had long been hidden in the netherzones, and encountered the wraiths, a group of people lost to the Republic’s databanks. In Rebel, we undertake a bold mission with Armand at the Institute for Radiation Studies itself, in which he finds himself opposed by a wraith assassin. Theodora is an alluring woman who insists she will do anything for the bounty—but Armand quickly doubts that she’s as mercenary as she would have him believe. Together they enter the secret realms of the Institute to find Armand’s captured comrade, with only each other to trust as they try to evade capture themselves. I like their journey of discovery and the way this pair provoke each other to reconsider their assumptions.

I felt for years that I’d done badly by Tupperman in not giving him a happily-ever-after, and there were certainly readers who agreed with me. His story finally came to me (maybe it was in a flash of angelfire!) and I’m happy that it will be published this year. Originally, I’d expected Tupperman’s story to be a novella, but he had more to say than that, so it is a full book, the fourth novel in the Prometheus Project. Abyss is set several years after the ending of Rebel, when the elite corps of fallen angels known as the Watchful Host are being stalked and assassinated. Tupperman embarks on a quest to save the souls of the angels he convinced to shed their wings, never anticipating that he’ll meet a woman who challenges all his preconceptions. There’s an excerpt from Abyss at the end of this book, just to tempt you.

The research for these books was fascinating, as it touched so many topics. I often find myself reading old stories and myths, as well as variations in familiar stories, when researching my books: angelology was completely consistent with that. I’m also used to researching different physical locations for my books, including the underground realms and the history of cities. But with the Prometheus Project, I had to learn a lot about radiation and nuclear bombs. Both proved to be fascinating subjects, and not nearly as simple as one might expect: the elusiveness of data was part of what inspired the existence of the wraiths in my fictional world. If you’re interested in learning more about nuclear research and radiation, I recommend these two very readable volumes: Before The Fall-Out: From Marie Curie to Hiroshima by Diana Preston (Doubleday, 2005) and The Plutonium Files by Eileen Welsome (Random House, 1999). They are both proof that truth is stranger than fiction.

Until next time, I hope you are well and have plenty of good books to read.

All my best,
Claire

Learn more about Rebel.

GUARDIAN Reader Letter

Guardian, book #2 of the Prometheus Project of urban fantasy romances by Claire DelacroixDear Reader;

There is something about a rogue of a hero that draws my attention at regular intervals. I don’t write that many heroes who are handsome, daring, reckless and indifferent to expectations (as well as committed to their own solitary status), but they are a lot of fun to write. I tend to write wounded heroes, who are noble and less-than-great communicators, particularly when it comes to expressing their own emotions. A charming rogue who has a gift for conversation can be a refreshing change of pace. Rafe, the hero of Guardian, the second book of the Prometheus Project, has many similarities to Gawain in my gothic medieval romance, The Scoundrel. Like Gawain, Rafe needs to be persuaded of the value of love; like Gawain, the right woman changes everything for him.

In the process of writing Fallen, the first book in this series, I became quite fascinated with the physical challenges faced by the fallen angel heroes who volunteer to shed their wings. What would it be like to experience sensation for the first time? Montgomery was struck by the pain in losing his wings, a loss that was more than skin deep. For Montgomery, at least until he allied with Lilia, this sphere was an ordeal to be survived. Rafe was different from his first appearance on the page—or maybe I should say his first moment as a mortal. He was enamored with sensation and I knew that his view of the world would be entirely different from Montgomery’s. For Rafe, the physical world offers an adventure to be savored. Once I realized that, I knew that there could be no better hero for Delilah, a young woman who has known nothing of joy or pleasure in her short life, than Rafe. For Delilah, the world is a dark and fearsome place, yet one she must embrace in order to fulfill her destiny. Given her past, she doesn’t really know how to start, but Rafe is an excellent teacher. I knew from the beginning that he’d teach Delilah more than she wanted to know, and that he would be reluctant to learn from her—but Delilah has an unexpected strength. Together, they are a formidable team and a balanced one—I hope you enjoy the story of how they conquer the obstacles before them together.

It is a wonderful thing to have a chance to revisit a book and create a new edition. When Guardian was originally published, it had some inconsistencies in the age of Delilah. Initially, I had thought she was much younger, but when she became the heroine of her own book (which was a romance at its core), she had to be older. Not all of the references were caught and corrected, and that always bothered me. This new edition gave me the chance to correct that and make a few minor revisions to ensure continuity between all three books.

Until next time, I hope you are well and have plenty of good books to read.

All my best,
Claire

Read more about Guardian.